Meet Our Students (11): Aye Thu Zar’s Story

I finished 9th grade in Burma and moved to Thailand in order to continue my education because my parents could not afford educational expenses in Burma. Here at Children’s Development Centre boarding house, whenever available, I attend pieces of training — I attended the English speaking, Child Protection and Adolescent training. My dream is to become a doctor. To reach my goal I am studying hard. I want to work in the healthcare sector because I want to work in the environment that requires a person who is willing to work for the sick and cure their illness or diseases.

 

Aye Thu Zar doing her duty with her group to cook and distribute food at the boarding house

My name is Aye Thu Zar. I was born in July 1997 in a small village in Hpa Ann,[1] Burma/Myanmar. My parents are farmers. I am the youngest of three siblings: one sister and brother.  I finished 9th grade in Burma and moved to Thailand in order to continue my education because my parents could not afford educational expenses in Burma.  I was 15-year-old. I like to study in Thailand because the education system is very different from what I experienced in Burma: the way of teaching and the atmosphere.

Currently, I live in Children’s Developing Centre (CDC) boarding house and am in 12th grade at CDC migrant learning centre. I have been living in the boarding house for several years.  This is the last year that I stay in the boarding house.

I love to be here, at the boarding house because I made a lot of friends who are from different areas and different backgrounds. Through this friendship, I have learned diversity. In the boarding house, teamwork is required as we are responsible for tasks. We are divided into groups. We have our duties by the group — we have duties such as cooking, cleaning boarding house or school compound, cleaning dishes before and after the meal, preparing table and chair for a meal and cleaning school compound. While doing a number of tasks in a team, I learned how to build up my teamwork and leadership skill, which raises my self-confidence.

While living in the boarding house I was also able to obtain useful vocational skills, such as baking cookies and sewing. Whenever available, I have attended pieces of training like English speaking, Child Protection, and Adolescent training. From the Child Protection training, for instance, I have learned how to identify child abuses and what is safe and unsafe touch. I gained more knowledge about child rights through the training. These knowledge is very useful as we don’t usually learn such thing at school. That is why I like participating in various training.

 

Students at CDC boarding house are enjoying dinner

 

My dream is to become a doctor. To reach my goal I am studying really hard and if possible, I want to join medical training after I graduate from the school. I want to work in the healthcare sector because I want to work in the environment that requires a person who is willing to work for the sick and tackle their illness or diseases.

The Dry Food program is very important and really fulfils my need. I would not be able to continue my education without the program. I can stay at the safe place and go to school. I believe that this program is very crucial not only for me but also for others in boarding houses because it helps us to access to education and protection.

CDC boarding house is one of the boarding houses assisted dry food by Mae Tao Clinic. It is directly supervised and managed by the clinic. There are 167 students living in the CDC boarding house and attending the CDC school.

 


 

Dry food program –
Children having a meal at CDC school

Children living in the CDC boarding houses and the Bamboo Children’s Home continue to receive support from MTC, allowing them to have a safe space to live and access education. The Dry Food Program continues to provide a safe living environment and provides basic dry food supplies to children living in 23 boarding houses including three months of emergency support across migrant and IDP areas.

See more about our Child Protection & Education here

 

 

 

Do you want to support our students? Click a button below to be a supporter!!

[1] Hpa-An is the capital of Karen State, Burma/Myanmar. The population of Hpa-An as of the 2014 census is 421,575. Most of the people in Hpa-An are of the Karen ethnic group [Wikipedia: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hpa-An]