Meet Our Patients (67): Win — Chikungunya (mosquito-borne diseases)

This year there is a mass outbreak of Chikungunya in Thailand; from January through the early July over 4,000 cases were reported. MTC has observed increased numbers of clients with mosquito-borne diseases, including Dengue fever compared to last year. Win’s symptoms show clear signs of Chikungunya: joint pain, fever, headache, rashes on the body. Health staff admitted him to Child IPD to monitor and provide treatment…

9 years old Win has been admitted to Child Inpatient Department (IPD) for 3 days. He is a student at Children’s Development Centre (CDC)[1]. His parents are from Mawlamyine[2] in Burma. They moved to Thailand in search of more job and education opportunities for the family 5 years ago. His parents have been working at a factory since then, earning 180 THB per day. They have a 1-year stay permit which allows them not to fear the police.

One day after school, Win felt that his body was becoming feverish. He did not know what to do as his parents were out to work. When his parents were back, Win had no energy so he was lying on bed, sweating unusual. The parents did not take it seriously but thought their son just caught a cold. They gave Win a painkiller. The next morning, they noticed that Win’s body was boiling hot and something was wrong. Win claimed that he had a severe headache, sore throat, and joint pain. His parents thought it was better to check his condition at Mae Tao Clinic.

This year there is a mass outbreak of Chikungunya in Thailand; from January through the early July over 4,000 cases were reported.[3] MTC has observed increased numbers of clients with mosquito-borne diseases, including Dengue fever compared to last year. Based on this trend, our health workers pay more attention to clients’ symptoms by referring to the WHO clinical diagnosis. But to make sure, health workers at Child IPD did the blood test for Win to check whether it is Malaria but it was negative. Win’s symptoms show clear signs of Chikungunya: joint pain, fever, headache, rashes on the body. Health staff admitted him to Child IPD to monitor and provide treatment.

“we know the risks of mosquito-borne diseases so we always use mosquito nets in bed. Although we are very careful of these, my son is now sick that makes me feel really bad,”

Win’s mother told us during the interview. Currently, Win is getting better so his mother feels relieved.

“we’ve known Mae Tao Clinic for a long time. Since we moved here, whenever we have health issues it is always MTC we visit. We have never used other health facilities as we trust that health workers and the services provided by MTC are the best for us. I am very appreciative that health workers have taken good care of my son and am glad my son is getting better. Thank you.”


In 2018, 1,199 children were admitted in the Child IPD. Of them 59% are under 5-year-old and 47.2% crossed the border to get treatment. Dengue fever, diarrhea, thalassemia, acute malnutrition, influenza and pneumonia together account for over half of the diagnoses.

Meet Other Patients Here


[1] CDC school: While Mae Tao Clinic (MTC) began as a humble health service delivery organisation, it has evolved into an umbrella social services network for refugees, migrant workers and other displaced Burmese. As a focal point of these activities, we find that child protection is a rapidly growing area of need. The Children’s Development Centre (CDC) has continued to provide education to displaced children from Burma. In the academic year 2019-2020, around 840 students are enrolled.

[2] Mawlamyine is the fourth largest city of Burma/Myanmar, 300 km south east of Yangon. The city is the capital and largest city of Mon State, Burma and is the main trading center and seaport in south eastern Burma. [Wikipedia: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mawlamyine]

[3] Outbreak News Today, http://outbreaknewstoday.com/thailand-chikungunya-total-up-to-4500-4500/: Thai Ministry of Public Health (MoH) has defined 20 reportable infectious diseases. These include acute watery diarrhea, jaundice and dengue. These diseases are under continuous surveillance and MTC is required to report the occurrence of any patients with one of the notifiable diseases to the Thai MoH within 24 hours of identification or suspicion.